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1. "The Chipper"

  • Published: 2013-01-11T18:39:16+00:00
  • Duration: 203
  • By Ray Fleser

The Chipper is a Crossfit Games event from the final competition in July, 2012. The Chipper tests all areas of Health Related Physical Fitness. Each technique requires muscle flexibility and muscle strength. Because the athletes advance through the techniques as fast as possible, muscle and cardiorespiratory endurance are also essential. With 3 of the movements ivolving the handling of one's body weight, body composition becomes a factor as well. The Chipper is not a power lifting competition or long distance run; However, it is a great way to see how you measure up with elite Crossfit athletes. The time for completion becomes the score. At the Crossfit Games, the athletes had to complete The Chipper in under 15 minutes. Seen in this video, Sean Kelly is coaching Ray Fleser, after completing it himself. Although neither athletes have competed in Crossfit, both Sean and Ray made the 15 minute cut-off. Seen here, Ray finished in 14:09. The winner of the games and Crossfit's Fittest Man on Earth, Rich Froning, completed The Chipper in under 8 minutes. The Chipper is one round, as fast as possible, of: 10 overhead squats at 155 lbs 10 box jump-overs with a 24 inch box 10 thrusters with 135 lbs 10 power cleans with 205 lbs 10 toes to bar 10 burpee muscle ups 10 more toes to bar 10 power cleans with 205 lbs 10 thrusters with 135 lbs 10 box jump-overs 10 overhead squats 155 lbs To complete this event, practicing and perfecting each lift prior to competition is crucial. Event demonstrated by Ray Fleser Coached by Sean Kelly Video produced by Ray Fleser


2. Frontside Turn Tutorial

  • Published: 2012-08-01T16:25:25+00:00
  • Duration: 61
  • By Ray Fleser
Frontside Turn Tutorial

This video tutorial teaches you how to do a front side turn on a skimboard. This is an advanced skim boarding technique that takes a lot of practice. -Find the right swell approaching the shore. -Begin running toward the water timing yourself and your speed to hit the wave as it is curling. -When sprinting, drop the board and get on it within 1 or 2 steps. Get on it quick so you don’t lose speed. You should drop, not throw, the board down you won’t have to chase it. -Once on the board, absorb the impact of the first water break you hit; you don’t want to lose speed here. -Approach the main swell and use your speed and the energy of the wave to ride up it, not through it. -Once riding up the wave, turn your hips and whole upper body around towards the shore. -Ride the wave back down and into shore. This may come easy to some and difficult to others. Be patient and keep with it! Video instructed and narrated by Paul Cross Video produced by Ray Fleser Annotated by Paul Cross and Ray Fleser


3. Get Thick or Die Trying CrossFit WOD

  • Published: 2013-08-21T21:02:12+00:00
  • Duration: 206
  • By Ray Fleser
Get Thick or Die Trying CrossFit WOD

This video displays the Get Thick or Die Trying routine. This routine, or WOD, was programmed by Ray Fleser as a Chipper style event. This means that it is a series of movements that test all elements of fitness, and are completed consecutively as fast as possible. Ray designed this routine in response to some people that were hating on CrossFit, stating that it is not real athleticism or training. Upon completing Get Thick or Die Trying, an athlete will display that he or she may not be the best at one thing, but can compete at anything. To Ray, that is more important than specialization. To quote Nick Martirossian, a teammate, exercise partner, and long term friend of Ray's: "I'm not the best at anything, but I'm top 5 at everything" Get Thick or Die Trying: 1 Round, As Fast As Possible, 30 minute Max: 10 Squat Snatches 155# 10 Front Squats 205# 1000 meter run 10 Push Press 185# 1000 meter row 10 Toes to Bar 10 Burpee Muscle Ups 10 Double Wall Ball 10 Clean and Jerks 205# 1 Strict Rope Climb (15 feet, no legs) 100 Double Unders Demonstrated by Ray Fleser, John Gallonio, Pete Salmons and Aaron Meredith at Ocean State CrossFit Video produced by Ray Fleser Music "If I can't" by 50 Cent


4. How to do Kipping Pull-Ups

  • Published: 2013-06-07T00:23:19+00:00
  • Duration: 245
  • By Ray Fleser
How to do Kipping Pull-Ups

This video tutorial teaches you how to a Kipping Pull-Up. This is NOT a Strict Pull-Up. This movement is performed to utilize the whole body, in the most efficient way, to achieve full ROM of a Pull-UP; arms fully extended to the chin higher than bar. The Kipping Pull-Up utilizes hip extension to transform horizontal movement into vertical movement. Because the hips are so efficient at producing power, Kipping Pull-Ups are much less challenging than Strict Pull-Ups. From a fitness point of view, Kipping Pull-Ups can be a better indication of overall performance because the whole body is being used to produce one movement. To perform a Kipping Pull-Up: Position yourself under the bar. Grip the bar in an overhand grip, with your hands slightly wider than shoulder width. Establish the Open to Close Progression. Once moving comfortably, establish the close position. Once you reach your end ROM, bring your legs a little higher, and lean back. Extend your hips up, towards the ceiling. Imagine a button on the bar, and you are trying to press it with your bellybutton. As you extend your hips, pull yourself up to the bar. Finish with your chin over the bar. Push off the bar once you have reached required ROM. Allow your body to move back away from the bar and your feet to hang. As you descend backwards, allow your body to swing back into the open position. Return to the closed position and repeat. FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything seen here. Video instructed, produced and annotated by Ray Fleser.


5. Cross-Over Dribble Tutorial

  • Published: 2012-07-20T14:02:07+00:00
  • Duration: 43
  • By Ray Fleser
Cross-Over Dribble Tutorial

This video tutorial teaches you how to do a Cross-Over Dribble with a basketball. This technique is a critical skill that allows someone to dribble in either direction around a defender. It is a basic skill that is usually practiced and refined early in a basketball career and is continued in the highest levels of play. One should be comfortable dribbling in each hand in order to properly perform this skill. -Dribble the ball with one hand -When the cross over is needed, perform a bounce-pass to the other hand -Maintain dribbling with the receiving hand Refining this skill will greatly improve your basketball "game" and ability to evade defenders and get to the basket in position to score. Instructed by Audrey Thorpe Video produced by Ray Fleser Annotated by Ray Fleser


6. How to do a Butterfly Kipping Pull-Up

  • Published: 2013-06-09T21:41:34+00:00
  • Duration: 160
  • By Ray Fleser
How to do a Butterfly Kipping Pull-Up

This video tutorial teaches you how to do Butterfly Kipping Pull-Ups. BKPUs are the most advanced progression of the Kipping Pull-UP, which are a more efficient way to perform the Strict Pull-Up. Like the traditional Kipping Pull-Up, the BKPU utilizes hip extension to transform horizontal movement into vertical movement. Unlike the tradional Kipping Pull-UP, the BKPU is a continual motion. On a KPU, you stop yourself once your chin is over the bar. You also stop yourself when transfer from the open to close position, or hollow position. Combined, the KPU has two stoppages, or breaks in momentum. The BKPU has no stoppages, therefore the momentum is continuous and more efficient. To do a BKU: -Start in a dead hang on the bar, with your arms slightly wider than shoulder width, and your hands in an overhand grip. -Move your feet in a backwards, circular motion. This motion is continuous throughout consecutive BKPUs. -As you feel your hips extend and your body become light, pull up. -Once you have reached you highest point, allow yourself to move forward as you come down. -Repeat. Your feet are the most important part of the BKPU. If your feet break the backwards-circular motion, you will not be able to get into rhythm. From the side, your head should be moving in a forwards circular motion. Your highest point should be BEHIND the bar, NOT over it. If you try and do BKPUs with your chin over the bar, you will crush your jaw. For efficiency in meeting the standard (chin above the bar) looking straight up will help you reduce several inches from your range of motion. Be careful as you come forward not to hit your chin on the bar. FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything seen here. Video instructed, produced and annotated by Ray Fleser


7. Hypertrophy, Strength and Power: Session 2

  • Published: 2013-06-03T02:38:41+00:00
  • Duration: 184
  • By Ray Fleser
Hypertrophy, Strength and Power: Session 2

This video teaches you how to do HSP-2, or the second of four sessions in a Hypertrophy, Strength andPower program. This program was originally designed by David Danker and Alan Ozdamar. It was then prescribed to the Maccabi USA Rugby team, in preparation for the 2013 Maccabiah Games. HSP-2 is apower movement routine, with emphasis on the upper body. HSP-2: Bench Press (use thick bar if available): 5 sets of 3-5 (work up to a 3-5 max) Reverse Grip Pull-Ups (Chin-Ups): 5 sets of 3-5 (adjust assistance/resistance to achieve a 3-5 rep max) Super Set or Drop Set: Dumbbell Bench Press, Rennegade Rows and Band Face-Pulls: 3 sets of 12 Dumbbell Curl-to-Press: 1x30 (each hand) 3 Round AFAP: MedBall Rotational Overhead Slams: 10 (each side, heavy ball) Dynamic Planks (Plank Saws if you have a slide board): (30 seconds) Lateral Bear Crawls: 10 Steps (each side) Sprints: Continue reading. Be sure to rest at least 90 seconds between each set on the Bench Press and Reverse Grip Pull-Ups. Let your body recover sufficiently to perform each set at maximum work capacity. DO NOT RUSH THESE MOVEMENTS! This is a basic Push/Pull technique; the two movements do no interfere with each other, regardless of how exhausting. The Super Set or Drop Set is performed at a much faster work rate. Use 30-60 second rest periods between sets. Decrease your load as you progress and keep up with the brink of failure. This follows the basic Push/Pull technique, incorporating a "burnout" movement at the end (the band pulls). The 3 Round AFAP is a basic full body dynamic progression. The slams can be done with a heavy ball (demonstrated in this video with a 35lb slam ball) or a lighter ball (be aware of your medball's bounce!). These are performed at maximum power and speed. Set yourself into an athletic position before each rep so you can explode through the movement properly. Do not get sloppy in lieu of the AFAP. The Dynamic Planks are a slightly isometric movement. They have much less ROM than the other movements. Just keep the core tight, keep your back flat, and move for 30 seconds. On the bear crawls, do your best to keep your back straight; try not to arch up, or "roll" your spine (vertebral flexion). Bend your knees and try to keep your butt down; don't lock out your knees. Try not to cross your arms or your legs. The Sprints: Rugby team divided into two groups with specific programming. As a flanker, I demonstrated this as a "Loose Forward." For both groups, your only break is the walk you take back to the starting line. Forwards: 5x10m 5x15 5x20 5x25 Backs and Loose Forwards: 5x20m 5x30m 5x40m 5x50m FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything seen here. Video instructed by Ray Fleser Video produced by Ray Fleser Video annotated by Ray Fleser Music: "Hysteria" by Muse


8. Single Handed Kettlebell Press

  • Published: 2012-07-19T14:44:21+00:00
  • Duration: 152
  • By Ray Fleser
Single Handed Kettlebell Press

This video tutorial teaches you how to do a Single Handed Kettlebell Press. This is a basic movement with a KB that works the shoulder girdle and arm. If done one hand at a time, it also serves as an abdominal exercise. -Have the bell in the “cradle” position. This is where the elbow is flexed and the bell is resting against the outside of the upper arm. Your hand should be close to your shoulder; the further out your cradle is, the more sheering force will be on your shoulder joint. Your flexors and forearm should be contracted to support the wrist joint. -Press the bell overhead until the shoulder and arm are “locked out.” This will happen when the elbow is fully extended and the shoulder is up as much as possible, potentially touching the ear. Allow rotation for the arm’s natural range of motion. Exhale during this press. -Descend the weight while following the same natural range of motion. Finish with the bell back down in the cradle position. Inhale during this descent. The Single Handed Kettlebell Press is a full range of motion technique. It is not a dumbbell press or military barbell press, in which the elbow joint only reaches 90 degrees. Because of this full range of motion with sheering and torquing forces, it can cause damage to the shoulder joints so be careful and ease into the heavier bells. Muscles utilized: Deltoids (muscles of the shoulder that elevate the arm) Trapezius (muscles that attach to the shoulder, neck and back to support the whole shoulder girdle) Triceps brachii (muscles of the back of the upper arm that extend the elbow joint) Internal/external obliques (muscles of the side of the trunk that keep the body erect) Transverse abdominis (muscles of the side of the trunk that keep the body erect) Instructed by Ray Fleser Video produced by Ray Fleser Annotated by Ray Fleser


9. Hypertrophy, Strength and Power: Session 1

  • Published: 2013-06-01T00:40:16+00:00
  • Duration: 123
  • By Ray Fleser
Hypertrophy, Strength and Power: Session 1

This video teaches you how to do HSP-1, or the first of four sessions in a Hypertrophy, Strength and Power program. This program was originally designed by David Danker and Alan Ozdamar. It was then prescribed to the Maccabi USA Rugby team, in preparation for the 2013 Maccabiah Games. HSP-1 is a power movement routine, with emphasis on the lower body. HSP 1: -Power cleans: 5 sets of 3-5 (build up to 3-5 rep max, record heaviest 5 sets) -Front Squats: 5 sets of 3-5 (build up to 3-5 rep max, record heaviest 5 sets) -Bulgarian Split Squats: 3 sets of 12 -Barbell Glut Bridge: 3 sets 8 ***3 Round AFAP*** -Side Plank: 1 minute (each side) -Mountain Climbers: 20 (4 count) -Straight Legged Plate Sit-Ups: 15 ***Sprints*** -40 meters -10 reps (15 sec break between reps) -2 sets (90 second break between sets) FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything seen here. Video instructed by Ray Fleser Video produced by Ray Fleser


10. Wakeboarding Raley Tutorial

  • Published: 2013-01-21T21:29:20+00:00
  • Duration: 79
  • By Ray Fleser
Wakeboarding Raley Tutorial

This video tutorial teaches you how to do a Raley on a wakeboard. There are sefveral prerequisits to performing this trick. You will need to be able to get up and comfortably ride on a wakeboard, and you will need to be able to do a heel-side wake-to-wake jump. Assuming you can do these techniques, you can attempt a Raley. Start by riding on the calm water outside of the wake, to the toe side of the boat. When you are ready to perform your Raley, take an aggressive approach to the wake. This means you will be cutting directly into the wake with enough speed to get enough air to perform a wake-to-wake jump, or higher. As you ride up the wake, keep your heel edge down. As you ride off the wake, allow the water to push the board and your legs back. As you go into the air, this momentum will cary you up horizontally and potentially inverted, depending on your speed. Once you feel that you are fully extended, pull your legs back in and plot your landing. You landing will depend on how fast you hit the wake. It is important to absorb the impact and return to a comfortable riding position so you don't catch an edge and wipe out. Video demonstrated and narrated by Jon Brisco Video produced and annotated by Ray Fleser Music Paradise, by Coldplay


11. Dive-Bomber Pushup Tutorial

  • Published: 2012-06-28T18:51:31+00:00
  • Duration: 106
  • By Ray Fleser
Dive-Bomber Pushup Tutorial

This video is a tutorial for the Dive-Bomber Pushup. This technique uses several muscle groups to bring the body through the horizontal and vertical planes of motion from a variated plank position. There are four basic phases to a DBPU. Phase 1: This technique begins by getting in a regular pushup position. From here, the feet are walked up a few steps to achieve an inverted “V” shape with the body. The first movement is an eccentric motion to “dive” down. During this motion the back must be contracted and chest facing the ground; do not crash down in a straight, diagonal line. Have a curvilinear movement pattern. Phase 2: Once the chest moves in front of the hands, the first concentric motion begins. All of the posterior muscles contract to extend the back and hips. As this is happening, the chest muscles contract with the arms to finish the movement with the body facing up and locked out. There is a full contraction and extension of the back, and a full stretch of the abdomen. Phase 3: Once here, the movement is reversed. What was just a concentric motion now becomes an eccentric motion as the body is reversed back down to where the chest faces down. Phase 4: The final concentric motion occurs next. There is a contraction of the shoulder girdles and arms to lock out and return to the starting position. Primary muscles utilized: Triceps brachii (muscles of posterior (rear) arm that extend (straighten) elbow joint in each concentric movement) Deltoids (shoulder muscles that aid in stability throughout exercise and elevate arms during final concentric movement) Erector spinae (muscles of the back that extend (straighten) the spine, fully contracted throughout most of this technique) Pectorals (muscles of the chest that adduct (bring arms toward midline) the arms to finish phase 2) Gluteus maximus (“butt” muscles that contract to extend (straighten) hips to finish phase 2) Transverse abdominis (muscles in the core that aid in trunk stability) Rectus abdominis (“6 pack” muscles of the abdomen that aid in trunk stability) Internal/external obliques (muscles of the core that aid in trunk stability) Instructed by Ray Fleser Video produced by Ray Fleser Annotated by Ray Fleser


12. Grace Got Thick

  • Published: 2013-07-01T00:37:02+00:00
  • Duration: 206
  • By Ray Fleser
Grace Got Thick

This video shows Ray Fleser and Sean Kelly doing CrossFit's Grace, at 225lbs, at Ocean State CrossFit. This is a heavy variation of the CrossFit benchmark WOD Grace. The original Grace: 30 Clean and Press (power or squat clean; strict, push or jerk press) 135lbs for men, 95lbs for women Score is your time (shorter the time, better the score) Grace Got Thick: 30 Clean and Press (same rules apply) 225lbs Score is your time (same concept; as fast as possible) The original Grace is designed as a fast pace physical evaluation. The clean and press utilizes almost every muscle in the body. WHen done in rapid succession, they become extremely difficult very quickly. Most fit athletes look the same out of the gate, but after about 10 repetitions, weaknesses are exposed and each rep becomes exponentially more challenging. With 135lbs, the original Grace should be completed very quickly. Elite athletes can typically complete Grace in under 2 minutes. Competitive CrossFit athletes can typically complete Grace in under 90 seconds. Grace Got Thick is a much more challenging WOD. At 225lbs, the repetitions were done one at a time. Keeping a slow pace out of the gate (1 clean and jerk every 10-15 seconds) was the fastest we were able to keep for the full 30 reps. If we pumped out the first 5-10 without a break, we would have hit the wall and needed a longer break. This is roughly 75% of our 1RM on a clean and jerk. If you attempt a heavier variation of Grace, you can apply that percentage to your 1RM and attempt with your own specified weight. Although you are going as fast as possible, you will need to take a few seconds in between in each rep, unlike the original Grace. Try and keep your time under 15 minutes. Video demonstrated by Sean Kelly and Ray Fleser Video produced by Ray Fleser Music "Beautiful People" by Marilyn Manson FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything seen here.


13. Wakeboarding Tantrum Tutorial

  • Published: 2013-01-18T00:16:54+00:00
  • Duration: 147
  • By Ray Fleser
Wakeboarding Tantrum Tutorial

This video tutorial teaches you how to do a Tantrum on a wakeboard. This is an advanced technique that has several prerequisite requirements. In order to perform this trick, you need to be able to get up on a board and comfortably ride. You will also need to be able to perform a wake-to-wake jump. And, you must be able to comfortably perform a backflip. This is not the time to learn how to do a flip. Practicing on a trampoline, diving board or on the ground is a better place to learn than the back of a boat moving at 23 miles per hour. Assuming you can do all these things, you can put them together and attempt a backflip on a wakeboard. The first thing you are going to do is pull away from the wake so you are comfortably riding on calm water to the toe-side edge of the boat. Once you are comfortably riding and want to perform your flip, you are going to aggressively cut back towards the wake on the heel edge of the board. When I say aggressive, I mean that you will be riding directly into the wake with enough speed to achieve the height and distance to flip and clear the wake. When you hit the wake, you need to be patient, and not attempt the Tantrum to early. If you do this, you will not have enough air to complete the flip. At the last moment on the wake, as you are about to go airborne, swing your back hand behind you to line up with the boat. At this moment, shift your weight slightly back. If the board is properly positioned and you have your weight back, the water will catch the heel edge and initiate the flip. Because you have momentum from your aggressive approach, you will keep moving but the caught edge will facilitate a flip. Landing is dependent on several things. The trajectory you will have depends on the size of the wake and the speed and angle in which you hit it. Regardless of the flip, your approach will determine where you land. You will start spotting your landing after you have gone inverted, or roughly 3/4 through the flip. Although landing on water, you need to absorb the impact smoothly in order to keep riding. If you find yourself landing too heavy on your heels, it may be because you began flipping with the board at an angle to the wake, instead of in line with the boat. This will cause you to flip off axis, which will affect your landing. As demonstrated here, you can also perform a Tantrum on a ripple outside of the wake. The flipping process is the same, except there is no approach or catching edge and the flip is much faster. Because the heel catch is not flipping you, you will have to be more proficient in the backflip. Video instructed by Jon Brisco Video produced and annotated by Ray Fleser


14. Hypertrophy, Strength and Power: Session 3

  • Published: 2013-06-11T17:52:41+00:00
  • Duration: 159
  • By Ray Fleser
Hypertrophy, Strength and Power: Session 3

This video teaches you how to do HSP-3, or the third of four sessions in a Hypertrophy, Strength and Power program. This program was originally designed by David Danker and Alan Ozdamar. It was then prescribed to the Maccabi USA Rugby team, in preparation for the 2013 Maccabiah Games. HSP-3 is apower movement routine, with emphasis on the upper body. HSP-3: Barbell Push Press: 5 sets of 3-5 (work up to a 3-5 max) Chest Supported Row: 5 sets of 3-5 (adjust assistance/resistance to achieve a 3-5 rep max) Super Set or Drop Set: Dumbbell Bent Row, Pike Push-Up and Bent Fly: 3 sets of 12 Dips: 1×30 (each hand) 3 Round AFAP: V-Ups: 10 Palloff Press: 6 (each side) Hanging Straight Legged Raise: 10 Sprints: Continue reading. Be sure to rest at least 90 seconds between each set on the Push Press and Chest Supported Row. Let your body recover sufficiently to perform each set at maximum work capacity. DO NOT RUSH THESE MOVEMENTS! This is a basic Push/Pull technique; the two movements do no interfere with each other, regardless of how exhausting. The Super Set or Drop Set is performed at a much faster work rate. Use 30-60 second rest periods between sets. Decrease your load as you progress and keep up with the brink of failure. This follows the basic Push/Pull technique, incorporating a “burnout” movement at the end (the Bent Flies). The 3 Round AFAP is a basic full body dynamic progression. The Sprints: Rugby team divided into two groups with specific programming. As a flanker, I demonstrated this as a “Loose Forward.” For both groups, your only break is the walk you take back to the starting line. Forwards: 5x10m 5×15 5×20 5×25 Backs and Loose Forwards: 5x20m 5x30m 5x40m 5x50m FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything seen here. Video instructed, produced and annotated by Ray Fleser Music "Fuel" by Metallica


15. Rainy Day Routine

  • Published: 2013-05-15T06:55:48+00:00
  • Duration: 120
  • By Ray Fleser
Rainy Day Routine

This video tutorial lays out the Rainy Day Routine. I programmed this routine on a cold, rainy day, when my clients and I had otherwise planned on going to train at the beach. We decided to make the best out of a nasty day and got a nice routine done in the basement. Seen in this video, I am training with a former rugby team mate, and 2 women I trained in a sorority bootcamp program. (The tank top is no accident) The Rainy Day Routine, is a 20 minute Tabata progression. Following a dynamic warm-up, a stretch, and an instructional, you complete 20 minutes of Tabata sets without stopping. Tabata is the name of the work/rest configuration of 20 seconds on, 10 seconds off. The 20 seconds on is performed at maximum work capacity and the 10 second break is your only recovery time. There are 5 sequences of movements, that are each performed for 4 minutes. Again, there is no break, so each movement transitions into the next. There are 3 full-body, metabolic conditioning movements. The thrusters, burpees, and kettlebell swings. These 3 movements are broken up by sit-ups, a much easier technique than the other 3. This is not a hypertrophic routine, so it does not pack on size. This routine is programmed for muscle toning, cardiorespiratory fitness, high caloric output and fat loss, balance and coordination. We started by running around for a quick minute, and transitioning through a series of movements without stopping. Between demanding movements we would jog in place. We went through butt kickers to stretch the quads, high knees for the hamstrings and gluts, arm swings for our shoulders and chest, high kicks for more hamstrings, arm circles for more shoulders, and power jacks to put it all together. In addition to getting loose, this kind of warm-up gets the heart rate up. We then went through a stretch progression. We did quad pulls, ankle cradles for the gluts, high knee pulls, chicken walk for the hamstrings, side lunges for the groin, we opened up our hips, did windmills for the core, lunge variations for the hip flexors and core, Scorpions for the back, back torquers, and spider-mans. Following our warm-up and stretch, I spent a few minutes on instruction. The people doing this routine were already proficient in the movements, so we just ran through set/rep/weight configurations and did a few repetitions of each movement. Once the whistle blows, its full speed, so doing a few reps of each technique helps familiarize yourself. It will also indicate if anything is still tight and needs to be stretched. Once we were all ready, we got right into the Tabata sets. The thrusters can be done any way you like. We did unilateral, or single handed Kettlebell Thrusters. You can use a barbell, water pipe or dumbbells if you prefer. Although the celling was in my way, try to get a full lockout overhead on these for full affect, and be sure to descend all the way on the squats. Whatever weight you program for yourself, try to keep it so you can perform at least 10 in each set. The sit-ups we did are the unassisted full body variation. In other words, you do not need a parter to hold your feet, and your swing your arms for a little assistance. These are not designed to isolate just the rectus abdomens; it is whatever you need to activate to touch the ground the behind your head and then in front of your feet. Try to complete around 10 in each set. The burpees came next. you must touch your chest to the ground and then your hands 6 inches beyond overhead extension. This was difficult in a basement, but we did the best we could with what we had. These get exhausting very fast, so don't overdue it on the first set. Getting 8 per set is a great target. After the burpees, do another set of situps. Again, shoot for 10 each set. The final movement was KB swings. You can do whatever you want as long as it is at maximum work capacity. You can do overhead swings or just hip swings. I didn't have the room for full overhead swings, so I switched to single handed swings with a flip-switch. I enjoy juggling the bell, especially at the end of a routine. After being at full throttle for almost 20 minutes, I try to control the finesse movements as well as the power. The flip doesn't make it any harder, its all mental and coordination. Once you're exhausted, those are usually the first things to go so this is good mental conditioning. At maximum work capacity, try and be hitting around 10 swings per minute. Thank you for watching. FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything seen here. Video produced by Ray Fleser


16. Basket Catch Tutorial

  • Published: 2012-07-24T23:18:09+00:00
  • Duration: 52
  • By Ray Fleser
Basket Catch Tutorial

This video tutorial teaches you how to perform a basket catch in soccer. This is similar to the direct-shot catch, however this is performed when the ball is too low to catch with your hands out in front of you. -Face the ball. -Stand with your feet shoulder width apart and slightly bend your knees. -Put your elbows together in front of you and lower your hands. -As the ball comes to you, scoop your hands under the ball and allow the ball to hit your upper arms and chest. -Bring your hands up to trap the ball. You need to bring your hands up immediately to insure the ball does not hit your chest/arms and bounce off. Tucking your head down keeps the ball more secure. This is a way to defend a shot and maintain possession while protecting the ball. If possible, this should be done when there are players near you to insure the ball doesn't get knocked out. Instructed by Jen Bannon Video produced by Ray Fleser Annotated by Jen Bannon and Ray Fleser


17. KB Curl Press

  • Published: 2012-06-18T21:56:25+00:00
  • Duration: 235
  • By Ray Fleser
KB Curl Press

The Kettlebell Curl to Press technique is an upper body exercise that utilizes muscles of the arm and shoulder girdle. The bell is held at a neutral position with the palm facing the body. The bell is curled up to the cradle position. In this motion the bell will rotate around the arm. This can place stress on the elbow and shoulder in some people, so be careful performing this. From the cradle position, the bell is pressed overhead with one more quarter turn rotation of the palm outward. In the overhead, locked-out position, the palm faces forward and the bell rests against the posterior forearm . Muscles utilized: Biceps brachii (muscles in the front of the upper arm that flex the elbow joint) Deltoids (muscles of the shoulder that elevate the arm) Triceps brachii (muscles of the back of the upper arm that extend the elbow joint) Internal/external obliques (muscles of the side of the trunk that keep the body erect) Transverse abdominis (muscles of the side of the trunk that keep the body erect) Instructed by Ray Fleser


18. Dynamic Stretch Routine

  • Published: 2012-06-27T22:40:18+00:00
  • Duration: 329
  • By Ray Fleser
Dynamic Stretch Routine

Dynamic stretching refers to techniques that stretch the muscle by putting it through a range of motion. This is different than a static stretch, in which the muscle is stretched by a non-moving joint. In this routine, Erik demonstrates a progression of stretches He starts with slow-speed, light stretches and builds into fast-paced, full range of motion techniques. This routine can be added to the introduction of any exercise. Dynamic stretching is not meant to fatigue or build muscle; it is meant to serve as a “warm-up” to get the body ready for exercise. Instructed by Erik Brierly Video produced by Ray Fleser Annotated by Ray Fleser


19. How to Get Up on a Wakeboard

  • Published: 2013-01-29T01:19:59+00:00
  • Duration: 88
  • By Ray Fleser
How to Get Up on a Wakeboard

This video tutorial teaches you how to get up on a wakeboard. This is the most basic technique in wakeboarding, and it is essential to be able to perform any other tricks. You are going to start in the water the your feet locked into the board. You will need to be wearing a life jacket. Have your driver start idling the boat forward to develop slight tension on the tow rope. As the driver moves forward and tension develops, you want to be leaning and floating on your back. You will have the board perpendicular to the direction you are going, which will immediately start giving you resistance. Slightly bend your knees and have the rope directly in between them. Once you are ready and in position, with the rope slightly taught and a stable foundation, you need to signal your driver that you are ready to ride. The driver's job is very important. As the boat moves, water pressure will develop in front of the board. This is what you need in order to get up. However, if the driver goes to slow, this pressure build up will be long and drawn out, and you will probably bail on the rope as you struggle. If the driver takes off too fast, the rope may just be yanked from your hands. You will develop a relationship with your driver and this may take a little practice, but you will figure out how fast to go with practice. Once your driver figures out how much throttle to apply, you can start riding. What will happen as the boat accelerates and the pressure develops, a swell will be created in front of the board. You need to push off of this swell with your legs and allow your body to come up and over it. If you push to early, you can push yourself under the swell and you will not get up. If you try to muscle up with your arms, your board may sink and you will go down instead of up. This will be heavy, and will pull significantly on your arms. You are physically overcoming your body weight with water pressure, so this takes strength. Once you start overcoming the swell, turn to your hips to the comfortable riding side with your lead hand holding the handle around hip level. If you have completed all of these steps, you should be comfortably riding on top of the wake. Do not get frustrated. This can take a long time to learn, but once you get it, you will able to start learning new tricks and enjoy wakeboarding. Good luck, and thank you for watching. FLESERFITNESS is not responsible for anyone hurt or injured attempting anything here. Video instructed by Jon Brisco Video produced by Ray Fleser Music: Good Life by One Republic


20. Pistols (Single-legged Squat) Tutorial

  • Published: 2012-06-28T20:31:03+00:00
  • Duration: 111
  • By Ray Fleser
Pistols (Single-legged Squat) Tutorial

This video tutorial teaches you how to do a Pistol, or a Single-Legged Squat. This is an advanced variation of the squat, a core and leg exercise. More than strength, this technique requires flexibility of the hamstrings, gluteus maximus, lower back and core. It also requires pelvic and core stability and balance. The movement begins by having one leg straight out in front you (holding the foot is optional). The descent is performed by an eccentric flexion of the acetabulofemoral (hip) joint and the knee. Once at the bottom of the range of motion, the accent begins, This is a concentric extension of the knee and hip joint. The hands can be held out for balance. Legs can be alternated for repetitions depending on the individual and the routine. Muscles utilized: Quadriceps (thigh muscles used to extend the knee joint, or straighten the leg) Gluteus Maximus (“butt” muscles that extend the acetabulofemoral joint, or straighten the hip) Erector Spinae (lower back muscles responsible for back extension, or keeping the back straight) Hamstrings (muscles on the back of the thigh responsible for flexing the knee joint) Transverse Abdominis (muscles on the side of the body, referred to as the “core”) Gluteus medius and minimus, hip abductors (muscles around the hip joint responsible for knee alignment when squatting) Instructed by Ray Fleser Video produced by Ray Fleser Annotated by Ray Fleser